Person: David Crane

Canada lacks the institutional structure to invest in the future

Budget 2017 promises $125 million to launch what it calls a Pan-Canadian Artificial Intelligence Strategy by promoting collaboration between centres of excellence in Montreal, Toronto-Waterloo and Edmonton. This, it says, will “position Canada as a world-leading destination for companies seeking to invest in artificial intelligence and innovation.” What’s missing as Canada seeks to position itself for the future, and this is critically important, is any institutional capacity to prepare Canadians more broadly for the future.

David Crane

A remarkable guide for how firms innovate
By David Crane

At a time when there is growing concern that slow growth may be the “new normal” and that the pace of innovation may be slowing, governments and businesses need better information on how they can improve prospects for innovation and hence sustained and growing living standards.

David Crane, commentator and consultant on innovation policy

Knowledge capital underpins productivity gains
By David Crane

Understanding the innovation process remains a key challenge for policymakers and business leaders despite an endless stream of studies. Yet getting it right is even more important today as we struggle to generate good jobs and wealth, with emerging markets such as China, Brazil, Mexico and Korea climbing up the value-added ladder while the US moves to more firmly position itself as the centre for advanced manufacturing and high-tech industries within NAFTA.

David Crane, commentator and consultant on innovation policy

Knowledge capital underpins productivity gains
By David Crane

Understanding the innovation process remains a key challenge for policymakers and business leaders despite an endless stream of studies. Yet getting it right is even more important today as we struggle to generate good jobs and wealth, with emerging markets such as China, Brazil, Mexico and Korea climbing up the value-added ladder while the US moves to more firmly position itself as the centre for advanced manufacturing and high-tech industries within NAFTA.

David Crane

Public-private innovation at the local level
By David Crane

Over the past two decades plant closings and lost jobs have become commonplace across the southern Ontario industrial heartland. Once-powerful corporations that built household appliances such as refrigerators and stoves, tires and chemicals, furniture and clothing, farm machinery, autos and auto parts or processed foods have closed plants and left hard-hit communities in their wake.

David Crane

Confronting Canada’s innovation problem
By David Crane

If there’s one thing that policymakers agree on it is that Canada has a serious innovation problem, and that this threatens our future well-being as a country.

David Crane

Canadian innovation needs more than incrementalism
By David Crane

When 54 leading Canadians get together to draft an action plan to make Canada an innovation nation with good jobs and prosperity, you would expect that they would come up with some bold new ideas.

David Crane

Canada needs to take innovation seriously
By David Crane

If you want an example of a country that takes innovation seriously, consider South Korea. Samsung, in a partnership with Korea Electric Power, recently landed a $7 billion initiative in Ontario to build 2500 megawatts of wind and solar power and establish four factories with 1,440 manufacturing jobs.

David Crane

S&T needs to be in Budget stimulus package
By David Crane

There seem to be three points of agreement on the forthcoming stimulus package, which will be presented in a federal budget on January 27: The package should be large, it should be capable of having a fairly quick effect, and it should contribute to the longer-term well-being of the country.